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Tabletop and Electronics

Industry Leaders Discuss the Future of Games

Published: 11/22/2006 12:00am

With change, especially driven by technology, buffeting the tabletop game business, ICv2 chose the last 2006 issue of its ICv2 Retailers Guide to Games (#13) to look at 'The Future of Games,' with an overview plus interviews with three industry leaders.

 

In interviews with WizKids founder Jordan Weisman, Hidden City CEO Peter Adkison, and Wizards of the Coast CEO Loren Greenwood, ICv2 asks about the impact of on-line gaming on other forms, CCGs with on-line elements, alternate reality games, PDF downloads and other trends.  The regular cartoon feature by John Kovalic follows this theme with 'The Best Way to View the Future of Gaming' as its title.

 

The market report asks, was 2006 a 'Turnaround Year?,' as retailers and distributors reveal guarded optimism about the upcoming holiday season and 2007.

 

And we also publish our best-in-the-business bestseller lists in five game categories.  Here are the ICv2 Top Fives (longer lists are available in the magazine):

 

ICv2 Top Five CCGs

  1. Yu-Gi-Oh!
  2. Magic: The Gathering
  3. Pokemon
  4. Vs.
  5. Universal Fighting System

 

ICv2 Top Five CMGs

  1. Star Wars CMG
  2. HeroClix  
  3. Dungeons & Dragons Miniatures
  4. HorrorClix
  5. DreamBlade

 

ICv2 Top Five Unpainted Miniature Games

  1. Warhammer 40,000
  2. WarMachine
  3. Hordes
  4. Warhammer Fantasy Battles
  5. Reaper Miniatures

 

ICv2 Top Five Board, Card, and Family Games

  1. Settlers of Catan
  2. Blokus
  3. Carcassonne
  4. Ticket to Ride
  5. World of Warcraft

 

ICv2 Top Five RPGs

  1. Dungeons & Dragons
  2. World of Darkness
  3. Mutants and Masterminds
  4. Exalted
  5. GURPs

 

For info on how to get your copy of the ICv2 Retailers Guide to Games #13, with the special interviews, feature articles, the full lists, and much more, see 'ICv2 Releases 'ICv2 Retailers Guide to Games' #13.'

 
 
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